Growing Things

The food, organic farmers, bees, community gardens, and other planting and crawling things that are making us Green

Minneapolis Composting

Special thanks to Lynnhurst Neighborhood Association for its excellent Minneapolis composting and recycling forum in 2015, where much of this was discussed The mixture of nitrogen-rich greens from food waste, and carbon-based browns from yard waste, combine over a six- to nine-month period to create useable compost for landscaping and road construction projects. But even…

Can You Feed Yourself? How?

At a University of Minnesota Student Energy Club meeting with guest Nate Hagens in December 2015, a student noted that in his native India solar energy is more widely recognized as the way we heat water and grow food. Hagens responded by saying that the United States will not be resilient if we lose 24/7 access…

Homegrown Minneapolis: A Local Resource Guide

“The main way that most people will experience climate change is through the impact on food: the food they eat, the price they pay for it, and the availability and choice that they have.” — Tim Gore, head of food policy and climate change, Oxfam There is a reason we are hearing more about urban…

Forum: Do Appearances Matter in Minneapolis Parks?

A related overview of our conversation of Sustainable We forum #1 focuses on the politics of pesticides — how are they regulated federally, enforced locally? Another article to come will look at why the Minneapolis Park Board allows them in some cases, and what the Park Board might be considering as revised policy. We also talked at length about how…

A Toxic Controversy in Loring Park

application of Loring Park pesticides, September 2015

It appears, from a photo submitted by a Loring Park resident, that the Minneapolis Park Board has not heeded concerns raised by many residents about herbicide spraying in the community parks. See the Reply section below for comments, including from Justin Long, Park Board Assistant Superintendent for Environmental Stewardship. There is also comment from a resident who found…

Grants for Raingardens and Permeable Pavers

In addition to the benefits of raingardens — covered extensively in this Q&A with Metro Bloom’s Rich Harrison — permeable pavers can be used on driveways and patios to reduce pollution runoff to our water streams. Storm sewers that feed into our rivers and lakes naturally fill with polluted water that comes off roofs during…